Migration VIII und I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VII

Migration VIII
I Wiederholung Migration VII vom 15.5.

Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.

Reflection
II Johnels, Linnéa: Exhibition: Communication with the Future about atomic waste

III Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.

V Joker: Belo Figo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ookGv44MMd4

VI Joker: Schriftwechsel http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/schriftwechsel/

VII Frage: http://www.menschenversand.ch/?sect=detail&id=100146
·  Ariane von Graffenried: Babylon Park
·  Sprechtexte
·  ·  Der gesunde Menschenverstand, 2017

Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

Worldship: Flucht von der Erde in den Weltraum: Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

II Gosia Warrink und Monika Pfau,  „Icoon for Refugees“, in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016), S. 285-294

III Tobias Linnemann und Kim Annakathrin Ronacher, „Rassismus und Weisssein, das spielt bei uns keine Rolle“, in: in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016),, S. 187-200
IIII Sandrine Micossé-Aikins und Bahreh Sharifi, „Die Kolonialität der Willkommenskultur“, in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016),, S. 75-85

Migration VII 15.5.

I Wiederholung Migranten VI 24.4.:

17.30: Ann Cotten

17.45: Abraham, Genesis 11-12;

18.00: Fertile Crescent

18.15 Hunger, Gewalt, Güter vom Pharao; Gott fordert auf, Gott verspricht; Abrahm ist trotzdem in Schwierigkeiten (Hunger, Gewalt); Abrahm wird in der Ikonographie stattlich inszeniert, nicht als bedürftiger.

18.22: Lesen, the answer averted.

18.30: Jabès Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

18.45: Lesen

19.00: Mise en page, italics, Capital Paragraphen

19.15 : Orthography, red ink

19.30 : Connection writing and speaking : Spelling

19.45: Desert as a page

20.00: A void: Gott mehr als etwas: Nichts und etwas.

Migration VII 15.5.

I Wiederholung Migranten VI 24.4.:

17.30: Ann Cotten

17.45: Abraham, Genesis 11-12;

18.00: Fertile Crescent

18.15 Hunger, Gewalt, Güter vom Pharao; Gott fordert auf, Gott verspricht; Abrahm ist trotzdem in Schwierigkeiten (Hunger, Gewalt); Abrahm wird in der Ikonographie stattlich inszeniert, nicht als bedürftiger.

18.22: Lesen, the answer averted.

18.30: Jabès Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

18.45: Lesen

19.00: Mise en page, italics, Capital Paragraphen

19.15 : Orthography, red ink

19.30 : Connection writing and speaking : Spelling

19.45: Desert as a page

20.00: A void: Gott mehr als etwas: Nichts und etwas.

Migration VI

Johnels, Linnéa: Exhibition: Communication with the Future about atomic waste

I Summary: Migration V

17.30: CA Conrad:Vibration, Connection or Translation
17.45: Nomadism, Migration, Exile
18.00: Ritual, strict formulas, as a connection to the cosmos
18.15: Jabès: Door : X; equations x with different variables
18.30: blotted door: communication through the door.
18.45: Migration: total migration from home land (Rosenzweig,)
19.00: Migration from every tradition (Jabès)
19.15: Flusser: no home in the language
19.30: What is a figre: A form of transfer: windows of the soul
19.45: Reading faster.
20.00: Reading it sentence by sentence

II Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

III Translation/action: Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.
IV Reflection

Genesis 11 (27-32):
Abram’s Family
27 This is the account of Terah’s family line.
Terah became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran. And Haran became the father of Lot. 28 While his father Terah was still alive, Haran died in Ur of the Chaldeans, in the land of his birth. 29 Abram and Nahor both married. The name of Abram’s wife was Sarai, and the name of Nahor’s wife was Milkah; she was the daughter of Haran, the father of both Milkah and Iskah. 30 Now Sarai was childless because she was not able to conceive.
31 Terah took his son Abram, his grandson Lot son of Haran, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, the wife of his son Abram, and together they set out from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to Canaan. But when they came to Harran, they settled there.
32 Terah lived 205 years, and he died in Harran.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Genesis+11&version=NIV

Genesis 12:
The Call of Abram
12 The Lord had said to Abram, “Go from your country, your people and your father’s household to the land I will show you.
2 “I will make you into a great nation,
and I will bless you;
I will make your name great,
and you will be a blessing.[a]
3 I will bless those who bless you,
and whoever curses you I will curse;
and all peoples on earth
will be blessed through you.”[b]
4 So Abram went, as the Lord had told him; and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he set out from Harran. 5 He took his wife Sarai, his nephew Lot, all the possessions they had accumulated and the people they had acquired in Harran, and they set out for the land of Canaan, and they arrived there.
6 Abram traveled through the land as far as the site of the great tree of Moreh at Shechem. At that time the Canaanites were in the land. 7 The Lord appeared to Abram and said, “To your offspring[c] I will give this land.” So he built an altar there to the Lord, who had appeared to him.
8 From there he went on toward the hills east of Bethel and pitched his tent, with Bethel on the west and Ai on the east. There he built an altar to the Lord and called on the name of the Lord.
9 Then Abram set out and continued toward the Negev.
Abram in Egypt
10 Now there was a famine in the land, and Abram went down to Egypt to live there for a while because the famine was severe. 11 As he was about to enter Egypt, he said to his wife Sarai, “I know what a beautiful woman you are. 12 When the Egyptians see you, they will say, ‘This is his wife.’ Then they will kill me but will let you live. 13 Say you are my sister, so that I will be treated well for your sake and my life will be spared because of you.”
14 When Abram came to Egypt, the Egyptians saw that Sarai was a very beautiful woman. 15 And when Pharaoh’s officials saw her, they praised her to Pharaoh, and she was taken into his palace. 16 He treated Abram well for her sake, and Abram acquired sheep and cattle, male and female donkeys, male and female servants, and camels.
17 But the Lord inflicted serious diseases on Pharaoh and his household because of Abram’s wife Sarai. 18 So Pharaoh summoned Abram. “What have you done to me?” he said. “Why didn’t you tell me she was your wife? 19 Why did you say, ‘She is my sister,’ so that I took her to be my wife? Now then, here is your wife. Take her and go!” 20 Then Pharaoh gave orders about Abram to his men, and they sent him on his way, with his wife and everything he had.

 https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Genesis+12&version=NIV

Attributed to Francesco Bassano the Younger (1549–1592)
Title    Abraham Leaves Haran
Description    On God’s command Abraham leaves Haran [sic Egypt!] (Genesis 13:1-2). Formerly interpreted as the exodus from Egypt. A train of people and animals go through a gate. In the middle a woman rides a white horse in between sheep, a dog, a goat and a donkey. On the foreground all sorts of household goods, pots and pans. From the sky God is looking down.
Date    Between 1560 and 1592
Medium    oil on canvas
Dimensions    Height: 95.5 cm (37.6 in). Width: 125 cm (49.2 in).
Moses, Flucht nach Ägypten, Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

Vilém Flusser, “Dwelling in Exile”, in: Christiane Meyer-Stoll (ed.), Migration (Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein 2003 (Köln : Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2003), p. 12-35

 

Migration V

 Klärung  Kunstausstellung Liechtenstein: Migration

Ausstellung Nordschweden zur Kommunikation von Atomic Waste

Pauline Oliveros

I Wiederholung

CA Conrad

17.30: Borges: Bias

17.45: Standardisierung durch Rundfunk

18.00: Akademien standardisieren, grenzen Slang vom Standard ab.

18.15: Codex Serafinus, Rossetta-Stone: Athanasius Kircher: Oedipus Aegyptiacus.

18.30: Kontakt mit Ausserirdischen

18.45: Talk hören.

II Jabès

III  Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.
Input http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/ubersetzung-des-textes-von-daniel-charms-aus-dem-multiplen-roman-von-adam-thirlwel/
http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/schriftwechsel/

James Joyce, Finnegans Wake (1939, London : Faber and Faber, 1991)

http://www.trentu.ca/faculty/jjoyce/fw-427.htm

p. ?

 

V Reflection

Flusser: Radical Migration

Abraham

 

Attributed to Francesco Bassano the Younger (1549–1592)

Title    Abraham Leaves Haran
Description    On God’s command Abraham leaves Haran [sic Egypt!] (Genesis 13:1-2). Formerly interpreted as the exodus from Egypt. A train of people and animals go through a gate. In the middle a woman rides a white horse in between sheep, a dog, a goat and a donkey. On the foreground all sorts of household goods, pots and pans. From the sky God is looking down.
Date    Between 1560 and 1592
Medium    oil on canvas
Dimensions    Height: 95.5 cm (37.6 in). Width: 125 cm (49.2 in).

 

II Gosia Warrink und Monika Pfau,  „Icoon for Refugees“, in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016), S. 285-294

Migration IV

Question: Nadia, Jonas
Proposal: Mohammed

I Repetition:
– Borges
– Franz Hohler – S Totemuegerli.pdf

Franz Hohler
S Totemügerli
Gäuit we mir da grad eso schön binanger sitze, hani däicht, i chönntnech vilicht no nes Bärndütsches Gschichtli verzelle. Es isch zwar es bsungers uganteligs Gschichtli wo aber no gar nid eso lang im Mittlere Schattegibeleggtäli passiert isch.
Der Schöppelimunggi u der Houderebäseler si einisch schpät am Abe, wo scho der Schibützu durs Gochlimoos pfoderet het, über s Bätzmattere Heigisch im Erdpfetli zueglüffe u hei nang na gschigelet u gschigöggelet, das me z Gotts Bäri hätt chönne meine, si sige nanger scheich.
“No ei so schlöözige Blotzbänggu am Fläre, u i verminggle der s Bätzi, dass d Oschterpföteler ghörsch zawaggle!”
“Drby wärsch froh, hättisch en einzige nusige Schiggler uf em Lugipfupf!”
U so isch das hin u härgange wie nes Färegschäderli amene Möuchgröözi, da seit plötzlech Houderebäseler zu Schöppelimunggi:
“Schtill! Was ziberlet dert näbem Tobelöli z grachtige n uuf u aab?”
Schöppelimunggi het gschläfzet wie ne Gitzeler u hets du ou gseh. Es Totemügerli! U nid nume eis, nei, zwöi, drü, vier, füüf, es ganzes Schoossiniong voll si da desumegschläberlert u hei zängbigerlet u globofzgerlet i gschanghangizigerlifisionööggelet, das es eim richtig agschnäggelet het. Schöppelemunggi u Houderebäseler hei nang nume zuegmutzt u hei ganzhingerbyggelig wölle abschöberle. Aber chuum hei si der Awang ytröölet, gröözet es Totemügerli: “Heee, dir zweee!”
U dene ischs i d Chnöde glöötet wie bschüttis Chrützimääl dure Chäschbertrog. Düpfelig u gnütelig si si blybe schtah wie zwöi gripseti Mischtschwibeli, u scho isch das Totemügerli was tschigerlisch was pfigerlisch bine zueche gsi. Äs het se zersch es Rüngli chybig u gschiferlig agnöttelet u het se de möögglige gfraget:
“Chöit dir is hälfe, ds Blindeli der Schtotzgrotzen ueche z graagge?”
Wo der Schöppelimunggi das Wort Blindeli ghört het, het em fasch wölle Härzgätterli zum Hosegschingg usepföderle, aber der Houderebäseler het em zueggaschplet: “Du weisch doch, das me ämne Totemügerli nie darf nei säge!” U du si si halt mitgschtapflet.
“So, dir zwee!” hets Totemügerli gseit, wosi zum Blindeli cho si, u die angere Totemügerli si ganz rüeiig daaggalzlet u hei nume ugschynig ychegschwärzelet.
Da hei die beide gwüsst, was es Scheieli Gschychets ds Gloubige choschtet u hei das Blindeli aagroupet, der eint am Schöpfu, der anger a de Gängeretalpli.
Uuuh, isch das e botterepfloorigi Schtrüpfete gsi! Die zwee hei, gschwouderet u ghetzpacheret, das sie znäbis me gwüsst hei wo se der Gürchu zwurglet.
Daa, z eis Dapf, wo si scho halber der Schtotzgrotzen uecheghaschpaperet si, faht sech das Blindeli afah ziirge u bäärgetglet mit schychem Stimmli:
“Ooh, wie buuchet mi der Glutz!”
Jetz hets aber em Schöppelimunggi böös im Schyssächerli guugget. Är het das Blindeli la glootsche u isch der Schtotzgrotz abdotzeret wie wenn em der Hurli-Gwaag mit em Flarzyse der Schtirps vermöcklet hätt.
“Häb düre, Münggu!” het em der Houderebäseler no naagräätschet, u de het er nüt me gwüsst.
Am angere Morge het ne ds Schtötzgrötzeler Eisi gfunge, chäfu u tunggig wien en Oeiu, u es isch meh weder e Monet gange, bis er wider het chönne s Gräppli im Hotschmägeli bleike.
Totemügerli u Blindeli het er keis meh gseh sis Läbe lang, aber o der Schöppelimunggi isch vo da a verschwunde gsi.
S git Lüt wo säge das vo da a es Totemügerli meh desume gschärzelet isch

II Reading of Jabès
III Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.

Input

http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/ubersetzung-des-textes-von-daniel-charms-aus-dem-multiplen-roman-von-adam-thirlwel/

http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/schriftwechsel/

James Joyce, Finnegans Wake (1939, London : Faber and Faber, 1991)

Recall
Tapaa!: Dari: Hill

stellas: Latin: Star

bedowern: German: Bedauern

luftstream: German: Luft

Taboccoo!: French: Tu as beaucoup; Persisch: Tambaccoo: Tobacco

http://www.trentu.ca/faculty/jjoyce/F1-1.htm

p.??

IIII Reflection

Attributed to Francesco Bassano the Younger (1549–1592)
Title    Abraham Leaves Haran
Description    On God’s command Abraham leaves Haran [sic Egypt!] (Genesis 13:1-2). Formerly interpreted as the exodus from Egypt. A train of people and animals go through a gate. In the middle a woman rides a white horse in between sheep, a dog, a goat and a donkey. On the foreground all sorts of household goods, pots and pans. From the sky God is looking down.
Date    Between 1560 and 1592
Medium    oil on canvas
Dimensions    Height: 95.5 cm (37.6 in). Width: 125 cm (49.2 in)

IIII Reflection B Codex Serafinus, Moses, Flucht nach Ägypten, Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

V Work

I Present a text that you want to translate within the group.

II Prepare for every session a tweet or a post which you consider relevant to our work.

III Translate a text of 9 000 signs. For each session you prepare a part of this translation (between 500 and 1000 signs). When you decide to translate poetry you may translate 9 poems, and you will prepare one poem for each session.

IV Prepare a presentation for your translation and the translations in our seminar.

 

Migration III

I Wiederholung: Radhik Natarajan, „Die Erfindung des Einsprachigen“, in: in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016), S. 261-274

 

Organ oder capsule?

Monolinguism and Diversity

Finnegans Wake

 

Tapaa!: Dari: Hill

stellas: Latin: Star

bedowern: German: Bedauern

luftstream: German: Luft

Taboccoo!: French: Tu as beaucoup; Persisch: Tambaccoo: Tobacco

 

Wolfson; Serafini, Autor, der nur von Kindern verstanden wird.

II Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

III Gedichte/Aufgabe
Jonas.

Borges at Harvard (talk or lecture)

http://www.openculture.com/2012/05/jorge_luis_borges_1967-8_norton_lectures_on_poetry_and_everything_else_literary.html

Codex Serafinus, Moses, Flucht nach Ägypten, Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

Migration II
Wiederholung

Before the law, stands a guard; exclusion, common features, Schwellen/tresholds; airports;Swedish, Portugiesisch, Arabisch, Spanisch, Italienisch, Spanisch, Luzerndütsch, Züridütsch.
18.45: Jabès.
19.00: Subversion, sensibility of intelligence, intelligence of sensiblity.
I Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)
II Input: Radhik Natarajan, „Die Erfindung des Einsprachigen“, in: in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016), S. 261-274
III Gedichte/Aufgabe
IIII Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.
Input http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/ubersetzung-des-textes-von-daniel-charms-aus-dem-multiplen-roman-von-adam-thirlwel/

Schriftwechsel


James Joyce, Finnegans Wake (1939, London : Faber and Faber, 1991)
p. 427:
http://www.webring.org/l/rd?ring=jamesjoyce;id=4;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.trentu.ca%2Ffaculty%2Fjj
I https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/j/joyce/james/j8f/episode1.html
II Finnegans Wake https://archive.org/stream/finneganswake00joycuoft/finneganswake00joycuoft_djvu.txt
III  http://www.trentu.ca/faculty/jjoyce/
V Reflection

Codex Serafinus, Moses, Flucht nach Ägypten, Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

Migration I

Edmond Jabès is well known for his writings on migration and exile. He published “A little Book of Subversion” where  he analyzes “doors”, “roofs”, “sand” and “whiteness” and “Blackness” as principal objects of a poetry. They reflect migration and hostility as conditions of contemporay writing and existence. The seminar discusses this poetry in the context of a history of artists and philosophers on the flight.
The seminar will have three parts: Part one is a close reading of texts, part two is dedicated to active translation and production. Therefore we will translate and create poems and fragments into German, English or other languages which are challenging our expressions. Part three reflects our relation to the status of being on the move or flight or dwelling as a stranger “in a hostile landscape”.
I Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

Answer-Question-Door
Roof
Wall
Desert
Place
Duration
The Book
Thought
Death

II Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration

Input http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/ubersetzung-des-textes-von-daniel-charms-aus-dem-multiplen-roman-von-adam-thirlwel/
http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/schriftwechsel/

Erín Moure, O Cadoiro

James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

I https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/j/joyce/james/j8f/episode1.html

II Finnegans Wake https://archive.org/stream/finneganswake00joycuoft/finneganswake00joycuoft_djvu.txt

III  http://www.trentu.ca/faculty/jjoyce/

III Reflection
Before the law

Stichwort: Franz Kafka, Vor dem Gesetz, in: Erzählungen (Frankfurt/M: Fischer, 1989), S. 120-121. [Vor dem Gesetz wurde bereits in den Erzählungen Ein Landarzt bei Kurt Wolff 1919 veröffentlicht], auch in: Der Prozess (Frankfurt/M: Fischer, 1989)

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/franz-kafka-erz-161/5

Orson Welles reads Franz Kafka Before the Law: http://gurusmusic.tumblr.com/post/76336439916/orson-welles-reads-franz-kafkas-before-the

Abraham, Moses, Flucht nach Ägypten, Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

Vorstellen: Dona Abboud, Out of Syriy, inside Facebook (Leipzig: Institut für Buchkunst, 2016)

Work

I Present a text that you want to translate within the group.

II Prepare for every session a tweet or a post which you consider relevant to our work.

III Translate a text of 9 000 signs. For each session you prepare a part of this translation (between 500 and 1000 signs). When you decide to translate poetry you may translate 9 poems, and you will prepare one poem for each session.

IV Prepare a presentation for your translation and the translations in our seminar.

Migration II

Before the law, stands a guard; exclusion, common features, Schwellen/tresholds; airports;Swedish, Portugiesisch, Arabisch, Spanisch, Italienisch, Spanisch, Luzerndütsch, Züridütsch.
18.45: Jabès.
19.00: Subversion, sensibility of intelligence, intelligence of sensiblity.

I Close Reading: Edmond Jabès, The Book of Resemblances 2 (Translated by Rosmaire Waldrop, Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1978)

II Input: Radhik Natarajan, „Die Erfindung des Einsprachigen“, in: in: Maren Ziese und Caroline Gritschke (Hg.), Geflüchtete und kulturelle Bildung – Formate und Konzepte für ein neues Praxisfeld (Bielefeld: [transcript], 2016), S. 261-274

III Gedichte/Aufgabe

IIII Active translation and production – Together we will form an ABC  of poetics and diagrams of migration.
Input http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/ubersetzung-des-textes-von-daniel-charms-aus-dem-multiplen-roman-von-adam-thirlwel/
http://mediendenken-maschinendenken.ch/schriftwechsel/

James Joyce, Finnegans Wake (1939, London : Faber and Faber, 1991)

p. 427:
http://www.webring.org/l/rd?ring=jamesjoyce;id=4;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.trentu.ca%2Ffaculty%2Fjj
I https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/j/joyce/james/j8f/episode1.html
II Finnegans Wake https://archive.org/stream/finneganswake00joycuoft/finneganswake00joycuoft_djvu.txt
III  http://www.trentu.ca/faculty/jjoyce/

V Reflection

 

04_Francesco_Bassano_-_Abraham_vertrekt_uit_Haran

Attributed to Francesco Bassano the Younger (1549–1592)

Title    Abraham Leaves Haran
Description    On God’s command Abraham leaves Haran [sic Egypt!] (Genesis 13:1-2). Formerly interpreted as the exodus from Egypt. A train of people and animals go through a gate. In the middle a woman rides a white horse in between sheep, a dog, a goat and a donkey. On the foreground all sorts of household goods, pots and pans. From the sky God is looking down.
Date    Between 1560 and 1592
Medium    oil on canvas
Dimensions    Height: 95.5 cm (37.6 in). Width: 125 cm (49.2 in).

Borges at Harvard (talk or lecture) http://www.openculture.com/2012/05/jorge_luis_borges_1967-8_norton_lectures_on_poetry_and_everything_else_literary.html

Codex Serafinus, Moses, Flucht nach Ägypten, Xenophanes aus Kolophon, Gericault: Floss der Medusa, Dead Man, First Contact, Dead Man

 

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